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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Updated April 7, 2014

Please note that dates and exhibition titles listed in this schedule may change. To confirm any information or for image requests, please call the BAM/PFA Communications Office at (510) 642-0365 or write bampfapress@berkeley.edu.

Download a PDF version of this schedule

Continuing

Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Malcolm X Steles
February 12 through April 27, 2014

The Possible
January 29 through May 25, 2014

The Elephant’s Eye: Artful Animals in South and Southeast Asia
March 5 through June 29, 2014

Deities, Demons, and Teachers of Tibet, Nepal, and India
June 26, 2013 through September 14, 2014

Kids Club
January 29 through mid-December 2014

Rebar: Kaleidoscape
May 12, 2013 through mid-December 2014

The Reading Room
Ongoing

L@TE: Friday Nights @ BAM/PFA
Ongoing

Opening

Will Rogan / MATRIX 253
April 11 through June 29, 2014

Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation
April 23 through September 14, 2014

The 44th Annual University of California, Berkeley Master of Fine Arts Graduate Exhibition
May 16 through June 8, 2014

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible
June 11 through September 14, 2014

Color Shift
June 18 through August 24, 2014

Hofmann by Hofmann
July 2 through mid-December 2014

Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy
July 23 through mid-December 2014

Geta Brătescu / MATRIX 254
July 25 through September 28, 2014

John Zurier / MATRIX 255
September 12 through mid-December 2014

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection
October 1 through mid-December 2014

Joseph Holtzman / MATRIX 256
October 18 through mid-December 2014


EXHIBITION DESCRIPTIONS


Continuing
Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Malcolm X Steles
February 12 through April 27, 2014

This exhibition presents highlights from Barbara Chase-Riboud’s artistic career, including six of her important Malcolm X sculptures. The artist conceived the first Malcolm X steles in 1969 while in Paris, where she moved in 1960. Abstract sculptures that combine cast bronze with wrapped skeins of silk and wool, these wholly unique, over life-size works capture a single moment in an endless cycle of transformation. Harmonizing various contradictory associations, they combine the vertical and horizontal, mineral and organic, male and female, fine art and craft, heavy and light, rigid and supple. In addition to works from the Malcolm X series, the presentation features a selection of closely related drawings.

The Possible
January 29 through May 25, 2014
Combining studio, school, library, gallery, and stage, The Possible is an open platform for exploring diverse creative techniques. This experimental exhibition transforms our galleries into studios—for ceramics, dye, print, and sound recording—to foster collaboration among artists and between artists and visitors. The exhibition builds itself over time, as works created in the galleries are placed on display and artworks and other documentation are assembled into a publication created onsite.
A special feature of the exhibition is Kids Club, a one-gallery installation designed especially to engage children in the creative process.

Visitors are invited to create alongside guest artists in the workshops, be inspired by a library focused on collaborative artistic practice, participate in performances and outings, and document and share their experiences of The Possible. The exhibition is organized by Bay Area artist David Wilson, with Director Lawrence Rinder. Kids Club is organized by Director of Engagement Aimee Chang.

The Elephant’s Eye: Artful Animals in South and Southeast Asia
March 5 through June 29, 2014
In the art of South and Southeast Asia, animals take on a variety of aspects and appearances. Loving companions, clever tricksters, or religious informants, they speak of the power of kingdoms, the wisdom of saints, and devotional desire. Sometimes sacred, sometimes profane, both gentle and ferocious, animals animate and enliven the scene. This exhibition brings together works from South and Southeast Asia, including a large temple banner from Thailand, a rare sculpture of Vishnu reclining on Śesanāga from Cambodia, Mithila paintings from a women’s collective in northeast India, Rajput miniatures, and a painting done by an elephant.

Deities, Demons, and Teachers of Tibet, Nepal, and India
June 26, 2013 through April 13, 2014
Joyful and sensual sculptural figures of Indian deities and dancers join radiant images of enlightened beings from Tibet and Nepal in Deities, Demons, and Teachers, which presents a rotating display of works by anonymous Indian, Nepalese, and Tibetan artisans. A tenth-century sandstone figure of Ganesha, the elephant-headed deity worshipped by Hindus, Jains, and Buddhists, graces the entrance to the exhibition, a site appropriate to Ganesha’s role in removing obstacles and blessing any new endeavor.

A new rotation of paintings in this ongoing exhibition throws light on the importance of the teacher/pupil relationship in Tibetan Buddhism. An important set of seven early eighteenth-century thangkas depicting the Great Fifth Dalai Lama and his lineage, painted in brilliant colors with burnished gold details combining the traditions of Central Tibet and the Chamdo region, emphasizes the importance of direct contact between teacher and pupil. The much beloved teacher Milarepa, who rose from a poor layman to become a great Tibetan enlightened master, is represented in an eighteenth-century thangka wearing his customary white robes amidst a mountainous landscape.

Kids Club
January 29 through mid-December 2014
Play with one hundred pounds of clay and display your masterpiece as part of an interactive artwork by Charles Long, climb into an art-viewing sculpture designed by artist Jay Nelson, and witness an ever-growing collection of drawings and sculptures created by fellow visitors. Come explore and create in the Kids Club, a special gallery dedicated to involving elementary-school age children in creative work. Created as part of The Possible, the space will remain active through the end of the year.

Rebar: Kaleidoscape
May 12, 2013 through mid-December 2014
We invite you to experience Kaleidoscape, an interactive seating sculpture custom-designed for BAM/PFA by the San Francisco–based firm Rebar. Kaleidoscape is both a work of art and a piece of furniture. Come rearrange the modular pieces to create a personalized environment for study, relaxation, or socializing. Or use the sections to create patterns, crystalline landscapes, or anything else you can imagine.

The Reading Room
Ongoing
The Reading Room celebrates the written word and the central part it plays in our lives. Books from several noted East Bay small presses are shelved side by side with cherished books left by visitors. Drop by to browse and view related artworks. Bring a favorite book to leave in exchange for one from the ever-changing collection. Read visitors’ notes on why they love the book they have contributed. Leave a note for someone else. On selected Fridays, the space becomes the site of RE@DS, our literary series dedicated to poetry and experimental fiction.

L@TE: Friday Nights @ BAM/PFA
Ongoing
On most Fridays, BAM/PFA keeps its gallery doors open until 9 p.m. or later for L@TE, a series of innovative, interdisciplinary events incorporating art, literature, film, dance, and music. Launched in November 2009 as an experiment to test the boundaries of what a museum could offer, L@TE has garnered critical acclaim and promoted dynamic engagement with diverse audiences.

BAM/PFA relies on a rotating cast of guest programmers with wide-ranging backgrounds to curate Friday evening programming, occasionally in conjunction with a museum exhibition. Previous events have included participatory drumming sessions, silent film screenings with live musical accompaniment, poetry readings, traditional Balinese gamelan music, a day of “secret” events accessed by deciphering clues, kimchee-making and food workshops, fencing, student-curated DJ events, and a dance-and-draw party. Music programs, presented by foremost innovators in the field, respond to the particular sonic properties of the museum’s vast concrete atrium. Notable performers have included Terry Riley, Anna Halprin, Joan Jeanrenaud, Devendra Banhart, Ikue Mori, The Residents, Negativland, and over a hundred others.


Upcoming

Will Rogan / MATRIX 253
April 11 through June 29, 2014
The work of art as it becomes bracketed in time and space undergirds much of Will Rogan’s practice. His photographs, drawings, and sculptures consider time in relation to the materiality and history of objects, often personal or mundane. This exhibition focuses on a recent group of photographs in which Rogan considers modes of staging, anthropomorphizing various objects while capturing them on camera, a process that reveals their inherent banality, but also their mystery. This is the first solo museum exhibition for Rogan, who received his M.F.A from UC Berkeley and lives and works in Albany, CA.

Rogan has had solo exhibitions at Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp; the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Laurel Gitlen, New York; and Altman-Siegel, San Francisco. Rogan’s work was included in the 9th Shanghai Biennale, and in group exhibitions at the CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit; Art in General, New York; and BE-PART, Partform voor actuele kunst, Waregen, Belgium.

Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation
April 23 through September 14, 2014
BAM/PFA has a long history of art and film exhibitions addressing a broad spectrum of social justice issues, and now we have teamed up with the Human Rights Center at the UC Berkeley School of Law to celebrate their twentieth anniversary with a juried exhibition of artworks by University of California students. Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation includes paintings, photographs, and prints representing emerging artist/activists from across the state.

In conjunction with the exhibition, BAM/PFA is presenting a selection of works from the Abu Ghraib series by internationally acclaimed artist Fernando Botero that the artist generously donated to BAM/PFA in recognition of Berkeley’s historic role in the arena of human rights. Four paintings from the same series also are on view at Boalt Hall. A related invitational exhibition, Envisioning Human Rights, featuring photography by artists who have worked with the Human Rights Center over the past two decades, will be presented at the Boalt Law Gallery in fall 2014.

The 44th Annual University of California, Berkeley Master of Fine Arts Graduate Exhibition
May 16 through June 8, 2014
Each year, BAM/PFA teams with the UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice to exhibit the work of their graduates in the galleries. This year’s graduates are: Joey Enos, Jason Fritz, Jessica Hankey, Helena Keeffe, Elizabeth Keegan, and Vreni Michelini Castillo. Be among the first to encounter the work of these six exceptional artists as they embark on their careers.
The artists work not only with the committed faculty of the UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice, but also with curators, registrars, editors, visitor liaisons, security staff, education programmers, designers, and preparators at BAM/PFA to realize their final student exhibition.

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible
June 11 through September 14, 2014
For most of his career, Forrest Bess (1911–1977) lived an isolated existence in a fishing camp outside of Bay City, Texas, eking out a meager living by fishing and selling bait. By night and during the off-season, however, he painted prolifically, producing landscapes characterized by planar bands and primordial coded symbols derived from dreams. By meticulously recording and studying the dream symbols in his artwork, Bess hoped to uncover their universal meaning. Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible presents approximately forty paintings, along with selected letters and rare works on paper.

Color Shift
June 18 through August 24, 2014
One of the most influential artist-educators of the twentieth century, Josef Albers (1888–1976) taught innovative courses at the Bauhaus in Germany in the 1920s and at Black Mountain College in the 1930s and 1940s. In his classes, he encouraged students to see principles of form and function anew. Albers and other Bauhaus artists developed a new process of creative visual thinking that sought to break away from the classical tradition. Albers was especially concerned with developing a “sensitive eye” for color, “the most relative medium in art.” Through his writing, teaching, paintings, and prints, Albers sought to understand how colors interacted.

Inspired by Albers’s ideas, Color Shift presents artworks from the early twentieth century to the present that explore color relationships within abstract compositions. Drawn primarily from the BAM/PFA collection, this focused presentation includes an array media, styles, and techniques—Abstract Expressionist paintings by Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko; the geometric patterning of Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Jennifer Bartlett, and Xylor Jane; the carefully crafted ceramics of Ron Nagle; radiant light works by Dan Flavin; and Ruth Laskey’s woven textiles—that demonstrate the contingent nature of color.

Hofmann by Hofmann
July 2 through mid-December 2014
In the 1960s the pioneering Abstract Expressionist painter Hans Hofmann made an extraordinary gift of nearly fifty paintings representing his highest artistic achievement throughout his career in support of the burgeoning University Art Museum (now BAM/PFA). As BAM/PFA prepares to move to an exciting new building in downtown Berkeley, we’ll revisit the enduring vitality and generosity of Hofmann’s gift. Hofmann by Hofmann focuses on the first group of paintings selected by the artist for BAM/PFA. Fantasia (1943), one of the earliest works, straddles a cusp between Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism while also anticipating the compositional logic and push-pull spatial dynamics of his signature color plane works of the 1950s and 1960s, such as Summer Bliss. In Nocturnal Splendor (1963) and Gloriamundi (1963), two of the later canvases, Hofmann arranges contrasting colors and shapes into expanding and contracting forces (push-pull) to create the experience of three-dimensional space. “Space”, he wrote, “must be vital and active—a force impelled pictorial space, presented as a spiritual and unified entity, with a life of its own.”

Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy
July 23 through mid-December 2014
The late James Cahill, Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley, was known as a brilliant scholar, exceptional teacher and writer, and an extraordinary connoisseur and collector of Chinese and Japanese paintings. He began collecting in the mid-1950s as a Fulbright Scholar in Japan, where he encountered significantly undervalued Chinese paintings of the Ming and Qing periods. At the time few collectors were interested in these later paintings and fewer still understood their inherent value. But Cahill recognized their importance and began a life-long pursuit of fine paintings. His collection became known by his studio name Ching Yuan Chai, given to him by his own teacher Shimada Shujiro. Today paintings associated with that studio name are among the treasures that make up the core of the BAM/PFA collection of Chinese painting. This small exhibition presents a handful of works that demonstrate the unparalleled range of Cahill’s collecting interests, from Summer Trees Casting Shade, a large decorative painting by Dai Jin (1388–1462), to the quietly cerebral The Zhiping Temple by Wen Zhengming (1470–1559).

Geta Brătescu / MATRIX 254
July 25 through September 28, 2014
Although an important figure in the history of Romanian Conceptualism, Geta Brătescu remains relatively unknown to Western audiences. This MATRIX exhibition—her first in a U.S. museum—features a selection of early videos, drawings made just after the Romanian Revolution, and textile pieces that evoke mythic subjects. Although her work emerged from drawing, she branched out into a variety of forms of expression—fabric, collage, film, photography, performance, and literature.

Inspired by a stimulating intellectual environment in Romania during the postwar era, on the one hand, and withstanding totalitarian repression on the other, Brătescu has remained devoted to her work through five decades of artistic practice rooted in her studio. Brătescu establishes a continuous interaction between life and art, reality and artifice, nature and culture, bringing the relationship between the design of everyday objects, art and human experience to close proximity. Her delicate, poetic works are typified by playful experimentation, coupled with an attachment to classical form and traditional techniques.

John Zurier / MATRIX 255
September 12 through mid-December 2014
The Berkeley-based artist John Zurier paints abstract, seemingly monochrome canvases with colors that range from muted tones to vibrant hues. Interested in capturing qualities of light and weather effects, the artist utilizes a repertoire of brushstrokes and surface treatments, revealing the texture of the canvas or obscuring it with layers of thick paint. Informed by Abstract Expressionism, postwar French painting, Minimalism, and Japanese aesthetics, Zurier’s work transcends the gestural and material to evoke the emotional. “I think the Japanese painter Ike no Taiga was right,” Zurier has said, “the most difficult thing to achieve in painting is creating a space where absolutely nothing has been painted.” In his first solo exhibition in a museum, Zurier debuts a new body of paintings and drawings.

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection
October 1 through mid-December 2014
American Wonder features approximately fifty paintings and sculptures from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries drawn from the BAM/PFA collection, one of the finest collections of American folk art in California, thanks to the generosity of two collectors and patrons, W.B. Carnochan and N.C. Edebo. The exhibition includes portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and a striking group of commemorative “mourning pictures,” representing indigenous expressions of American culture in the post-Revolutionary through Civil War periods.

Joseph Holtzman / MATRIX 256
October 18 through mid-December 2014
Best known as the founder and editor of the groundbreaking architecture and interiors magazine Nest (1997–2004), Joseph Holtzman is also a painter whose work is rich in art historical references and at the same time arrestingly new. For MATRIX 256, the artist’s first solo exhibition in a museum, Holtzman displays several large oil-on-marble paintings. Each of these unusually heavy works involve adhering anywhere between 150 to 200 tubes of oil paint to each of the marble’s surface; the paint is then scraped off repeatedly with a razor to reveal other colors underneath, while leaving behind a thick and heavy layered surface of paint. Utilizing a style that fluctuates between abstraction and figuration, the artist produces portraits of friends and historical figures. Holtzman’s work is rich in art historical references and at the same time arrestingly new.

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